Posted by: Joseph J. Skarzenski | July 13, 2009

Another busy day to conclude the Session 1 excursion

Students in front of the stadium at Olympia with Mr. Kiritsis (UINDY Vice Chancellor)

Students in front of the stadium at Olympia with Mr. Kiritsis (UINDY Vice Chancellor)

It’s 9:30 AM and we are leaving the beautiful Olympion Asty hotel. After having a very filling breakfast, we headed out to Zeus’s Sanctuary, where the original Olympics were held. There we met our fantastic tour guide who started to walk us into the fields. Sitting briefly, we received the general background of the sanctuary and the Olympic games. Our guide explained to us the social, political, and religious reasons the Olympics were held.

Walking into the Sanctuary of Zeus (Olympia)

Walking into the Sanctuary of Zeus (Olympia)

Soon enough we began our walk towards the old track field. We stopped in front of the old Temple of Hera where we sat for another presentation from our tour guide. She showed us all of the surrounding ruins where we stopped and explained what each one was. The first ruin she showed us was the Phillipian, a structure built by Phillip II when Greece operated under Macedonian rule. It was a great opportunity to see the Phillipian, since Greece has been using the structure as a point against FYROM in the Macedonia name dispute. We also saw the Temple of Hera and the place where the original Olympic flame use to be lit.

Learning about the religious, social, and political effects of the Olympics.

Learning about the religious, social, and political effects of the Olympics.

From there we continued towards the original track where field and running events were held. Before entering the track, our tour guide gave us one last lecture. She gave us further details about the Olympics, such as how the events consisted of only men with one woman. She also elucidated on some of the social, political, and religious reasons behind the events. From there we walked directly to the field. On the way in we took an awesome group photo at the archway. Once inside, students lined up on the end of the track to pose for a faux running shot. Some students actually decided to follow through on the pose by sprinting to the end of the track and back. We then had some free time in the area before we met for lunch. Probably the biggest attraction to see after the field was the Temple of Zeus, which many visited.

Before we left for our next visit, we had a fantastic lunch in Olympia. We were then on our way to Epivadros. After another bus ride, we arrived to the ancient theatre there. Many took seats throughout the massive theatre. Some walked to the centre of the stage to test out the perfect harmony. From having conversations with people at the top row, to dropping coins on the centre stone, students were amazing by the noise that resonated throughout the theatre. We continued our visit by going to the archaeological museum across from the threatre. After walking through the exhibits we returned outside and waited to board our bus.

Students in front of the ancient theatre in Epivadros

Students in front of the ancient theatre in Epivadros

Next on our agenda was our bus ride home. We broke up the long ride by stopping in Corinth. There we saw the Corinth canal, the architectural triumph that connects the Aegean and Ionian seas.

We then headed back for Athens to start another busy week of events.

To see photo’s from today’s visits, Zeus’s Sanctuary and the ancient theatre in Epivadros, click the link below.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/39885149@N06/sets/72157621276751605/show/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: